December’s recipes: Movers & shakers

Round & About

cocktails

We’ve teamed up with multisensory creators Sam Bompas and Harry Parr to serve up some cocktail fresh recipes from The Bompas & Parr Cocktail Book

Formula E

Ingredients:

• 60 ml/2½ fl oz ‘electrified’ Absolut Citron vodka
• 15 ml/½ fl oz triple sec
• 30 ml/1 fl oz lemon juice
• 1 medium egg white (20 ml/2/3 fl oz egg white)
• 2–3 drops blue food colouring

This was created for the organisers of Formula E to mark the race’s return to London in 2016. We served it along the top corridor of Tower Bridge to the epic backdrop of our home city.
This is an excellent example of how vodka acts as a flavour vehicle. For the original drink we included a touch of the eco-friendly saline algae Formula E uses to power its electricity generators to lend the drink its blue-green hue. You can simply add a little blue food colouring to convey the colour of electricity.
The ‘electrified’ vodka is simply Absolut Citron lemon-flavoured vodka infused with Japanese Sancho pepper. Pour 25 or so of these peppercorns into a bottle of the stuff and leave for a couple of days to add some zingy spice. If you can get some Szechuan buttons, even better – these taste like you’re licking an 8V battery, a comparison which you’ll either ‘get’ or will not.

Method:
Dry shake all the ingredients to emulsify the egg white, then add ice cubes and shake again. Fine strain into a chilled coupe glass. For Formula E we garnished the drink with some blue-coloured Sancho pepper-flavoured popping candy.

Mojito

Ingredients:

• Large sprig of mint
• 60 ml/21/2 fl oz white rum
• 30 ml/1 fl oz lime juice
• 2 tsp white caster sugar
• Top with soda water
• Wedge of lime and fresh mint leaves to garnish

This is one cocktail where it’s better to use sugar rather than sugar syrup – the sugar crystals lacerate the mint as you muddle and it releases a lot of flavour. It’s a refreshing drink – a light sour that has been lengthened with lots of soda. It’s traditional to make it in the glass that you are ser ving it in. It originates from Cuba and was a favourite drink of the writer Ernest Hemingway when he lived there in the 1940s.

Method:
Put 5–6 mint leaves in the bottom of a highball glass, and use the non-spoon end of a bar spoon to gently bruise (but not crush) the leaves. Pour over the rum, lime juice and sugar. Next, fill the glass with crushed ice and churn the mix with your spoon. Top with soda, add extra crushed ice to ensure a good pile is showing above the rim of the glass, then finally garnish with a wedge of lime and tuck the remainder of your mint leaves in among the ice.

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