Alzheimer’s memory walk

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Join a memory walk against dementia and raise funds for the Alzheimer’s Society

Alzheimer’s Society is calling on family, friends and colleagues to unite against dementia this autumn by joining  one of several memory walks being held across the country.

There are 43 walks taking place this autumn – including five longer marathon style walks, all raising funds to create lasting chances for people affected by the condition.

Dementia devastates lives, but every pound raised through Memory Walk will help Alzheimer’s Society provide vital information and support, improve care and fund research.

This year, Memory Walk will bring together more than 120,000 walkers, with the hope of raising in excess of £9million.

This Sunday, you can join one in Oxford University Parks – registrations close today so you’ll need to be quick if you want to take part in this one.

The shorter 3km walk is a gentle stroll ideal for any age, while the longer 6.5km will loop you around the park. Arrive from 10am, the walk starts at 11am.

If you do miss out how about trying the one in Windsor Great Park on Saturday, 21st September, registration for this one closes on Thursday 19th.

Take the shorter walk of 3.5km for a stroll suitable for all around parkland or try the 8km undulating walk which passes through stunning countryside. Don’t forget your wellies or walking boots!

Arrive from 9.30am for the walk which starts at 11am.

In Surrey, you can take part in Painshill walk on Sunday, 6th October and you can choose to take either the shorter 2km walk or a longer 7km walk. The 2km gentle stroll goes around the lake and is suitable for Memory Walkers of all ages including pushchairs and wheelchairs. The longer 7km walk will take you further around the park, with some muddy patches so don’t forget your wellies and walking boots! All routes and distances are subject to change.

All routes will start and finish at Painshill, by the cafe, where there will be a hive of activity to get everyone ready for Memory Walk.

Take a moment to reflect on who you are walking for by leaving a message on the Memory Tree, and watch it blossom through the day.

Walkers should arrive from 9.30am and the walk starts at 11am.

Registration is £10 and closes on 3rd October.

Someone develops dementia every three minutes

Unite against dementia and register now

Windsor Fringe 2019

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Theatre, comedy, music, dance, family shows, a pop up record stall and music around a fire pit are among some of the many amazing attractions at this year’s Windsor Fringe. 

There are more than 130 performers and artists, showcasing local and national talent at the event from 20th September to 6th October, the second oldest fringe in the UK after Edinburgh. 

The launch party kicks off the festival with music from DJ Steve Nash and guests playing everything from reggae and jazz to funk and disco with drinks and food from street vendors to make it a great way to start. 

Among the many musical highlights of the festival are jazz singers Claire Martin and Ian Shaw with A Century of Song (21st); traditional music from Spain with The Maiden & The Thief (25th); The Magic of Motown (27th) and An Afternoon of Music & Colour brings R&B and funk on the 29th. 

There’s theatre in the form of The Red Balloon (21st) and a trip through Shakespeare in The battle of Love and Power (29th) before you go on Journey’s End on 1st and 2nd October. 

Join a Victorian Windsor walking tour, discover Queen Anne’s Windsor and enjoy some of the work put on display by more than 30 artists at open house events around the town.  

The family is well catered for entertainment to suit all ages from dance to an arts festival day and join The Last Puppet with an adventure aboard ship. 

The festival also features the 16th international Kenneth Branagh Award for new drama writing. The three finalists’ plays will be performed nightly on 3rd, 4th, and 5th October before a panel of judges chooses the overall winner – why not watch one a night at The Old Court and decide for yourself? 

Windsor Fringe

To find out more about all the events at Windsor Fringe and to book tickets

Literary heaven

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Marlborough is set to welcome writers and readers of all sorts as it celebrates 10 years of its LitFest

MLF2019 David Baddiel_author_pic
MLF2019 David_Baddiel_Head_Kid_BookCover
MLF2019 Author Ian Rankin (c) Hamish Brown
IN A HOUSE OF LIES FINAL

Award-winning writers, established names and emerging authors are all on the bill at this year’s Marlborough LitFest which is celebrating its 10th anniversary.

Children’s authors, poetry events and themes including history, archaeology, mental health, travel, sports, food, nature and adventure should guarantee that there truly is something for everyone to enjoy this month.

Among the well-known names set to appear are Ben Okri, who is this year’s Golding Speaker, and favourites such as ian Rankin, Joanne Harris, Carol Ann Duffy, Robert Harris and David Baddiel.

Chair of Marlborough LitFest, Genevieve Clarke, said: “The LitFest has come a long way in 10 years. We’re thrilled to be celebrating our first decade with established literary names, plenty of writers just starting out, a mix of themes, creative workshops and a fabulous children’s programme. We’ve also stepped up our commitment to outreach as a way of drawing in new audiences from Marlborough and beyond. I’d like to thank our committee, volunteers and sponsors for all their help in putting together an exciting programme for 2019.”

The festival which features nearly 40 events this year will begin with poet Carol Ann Duffy on Thursday, 26th September at Marlborough College where she will read from her latest collection, Sincerity as well as some of her earlier work.

The Golding Speaker Ben Okri will address the audience at the Town Hall on Friday 27th. The Nigerian-born writer came to recognition in 1991 when aged just 32 he was the youngest winner of the Man Booker Prize for his novel The Famished Road.

Debut authors will feature alongside the established with Elizabeth Macneal and Stacey Halls showcasing their novels on Saturday 28th. Macneal’s The Doll Factory is set in 1850s London and tells of a woman who is both artist and artist’s model. Halls’s novel The Familiars is set at the time of the Pendle witch trials when 10 people were hanged for murder by witchcraft.

Among the other attractions is this year’s Big Town Read, Raynor Winn’s The Salt Path,

chosen for local book groups to enjoy and telling the true story of a homeless, penniless, jobless couple who walk the 630 miles of the South West Coast Path from Minehead to Poole. Their walk and the story of it is defiant and life-affirming.

Festival favourite, Poetry in the Pub returns and new for this year is LitFest’s own What the Papers Say on Sunday morning.

A key feature of this year’s festival is the growth of its outreach events which intend to bring the best of good writing to Marlborough and this year includes a partnership with Save the Children, links with HMP Erlestoke and increased activity with local schools.

Marlborough LitFest

To find out more about everything that’s going on and to book

A true Christie classic

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Turn sleuth and track down a great weekend of Agatha Christie-inspired activities

If you’re ever fancied yourself as a bit of a sleuth there’s the perfect opportunity to put your skills to the test at this year’s Agatha Christie weekend.

Discover the real-life world of the Queen of Crime who lived in Wallingford and Cholsey for 42 years until her death in 1976 writing many of the novels for which she is best known.

As part of this year’s weekend, unleash you inner Hercule Poirot or Miss Marple and take part in Science Oxford’s CSI Forensic Challenge at Wallingford Museum. With a fresh crime scene, grab your magnifying glass and dusting powder, unravel alibis and solve clues to find out whodunit. Booking is essential for this with sessions at 6.30pm, 7.15pm and 8pm.

Among other events planned for the weekend from Friday, 6th to Sunday, 8th September are a talk at Cholsey Church where she and husband Max Mallowan are buried – Murder Most Flowery will look at Christie’s use of horticulture in the creation and solving of whodunits given by keen gardener and fan, Ruth Brompton-Charlesworth. The talk will take place at Cholsey’s St Mary’s Church, 7.30pm and includes a glass of wine or soft drink, tickets £12.

Across the weekend Wallingford Museum will hold an enhanced exhibition, At home with the Queen of Crime, and in Cholsey Old School enjoy the A is for Agatha art exhibition which will feature work created by artists who each read one of her murder mysteries and then used their own interpretation to depict it.

Agatha Christie

Tickets for all events can be bought from Wallingford Museum or call 01491 651127.

Field day!

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Five educational benifits of visiting a farm

• Sensory Development – toddlers discover and learn about their world through the five senses: touch, taste, smell, hearing and sight. What better place to awaken all of these than a farm? Stroking animals teach children about what different textures feel like. Do they prefer the soft touch of a rabbit compared to the wiry texture of a sheep? A farm is also the perfect place to develop the skill of listening. All of the baas, moos, oinks and neighs will help children identify the animals’ unique sounds. And there is no need to mention how smelly farms can be…

• Motor Skill Development – motor skills are constantly being developed through a toddler’s life. Motor skills are simply anything that uses their muscles. Gross motor skills involve large movements such as running across the field to greet a cow, or climbing up on a haybale. Fine motor skills are small movements such as holding a brush to groom a horse, or picking a blade of grass to feed the goats.

• Language Development – this is the process by which a toddler learns to understand and communicate. Now, the animals may not be able to talk back but children love to chat away to them and perhaps because they can’t respond the children fill the silence happily with even more chatter. And what a great place to learn lots of new words – it isn’t every day that you would need to use the words ‘combine harvester’.

• Empathy – toddlers begin to develop the ability to understand and share the feelings of others and this isn’t limited to other humans. Asking children questions such as, “Do you think the sheep likes being stroked?” and “Do you think the rabbit is hungry?” will help children consider their feelings.

• Food Production – it is more relevant than ever that children start understanding where food comes from. Learning that the lovely soft, feathery chickens produce eggs and that pulling on the tuft of green leaves will pull out a carrot is a great starting point. But why stop at the farm? Why not create a vegetable patch at home, or start with something more simple such as growing cress in a pot. The possibilities are endless!

With all of these benefits to be gained why not join Highfield and Brookham Schools on Friday 27th September, from 10am – 12pm, for their free hands-on educational farm experience morning for children aged 2+? They have teamed up with Mill Cottage Farm in Alton to bring all of these benefits to your child for free!

Sophie Baber, Head of Brookham School, says “Farms are magical places for little eyes and hands, and act as educational playgrounds for young minds. We are delighted to invite children aged 2+ to the farm as it is a great opportunity for them to learn about and interact with a variety of friendly farm animals, as well as the countryside and nature. Children will have the chance to stroke and brush the animals, aiding their sensory development, and to identify the animals, which can help encourage language development. We look forward to welcoming you to Brookham.”

Book your free place at highfieldandbrookham.co.uk/farm-visit

About Highfield and Brookham Schools:

• Highfield and Brookham Schools are in Liphook on the edge of the Surrey, Hampshire and West Sussex borders. They can be found nestled in the South Downs National Park off Highfield Lane.

• They are a nursery, pre-prep and prep school for children aged 3 -13.

• Optional boarding is available for children from Year 4.

• Facilities include a newly refurbished nursery, Forest School complete with a tree house, on-site swimming pool and 175 acres of grounds.

• Specialist teaching in PE, Modern Languages, Music and Forest School.

Highfield & Brookham

For any further information, please contact Charlotte Green on

[email protected]

 

 

All the world’s a stage…

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Abingdon Drama Club is celebrating its 75th anniversary

In December 1944, during the Second World War, a group of Abingdon folk decided to start a new drama group and 75 years later, Abingdon Drama Club is going from strength to strength.

It is one of the oldest drama clubs in the country and since its inception has presented more than 300 productions from the first in 1945, London Wall by John Van Druten in the Corn Exchange in the Market Place to its upcoming production of Amadeus at the end of September.

The first club meetings took place at the Old Carpet Factory near Abingdon Bridge before moving to the Friends’ Meeting House on the Vineyard. The current club house in Marcham Road has been their home since 1960 and features rehearsal space, a green room, set workshop and costume and prop stores.

The venue is also home to the junior drama classes which have been teaching and guiding the next generation of young actors and putting on their own productions for more than 35 years.

Most of Abingdon Drama Club’s plays are performed at the Unicorn Theatre which was created in 1953. ADC was asked to stage the first play performed at the atmospheric and intimate theatre in the medieval Abbey buildings, choosing Henry Porter’s The Two Angry Women of Abingdon. Since then they have gone on to stage a variety of work from tragedy to farce, by well-known names and some home-grown talent.

Over the years, the club’s work has received many accolades including the Daily Mail in 1947 which wrote there are “…many amateur companies whose productions, within their necessary limitations, are quite brilliant. I will name the Abingdon Drama Club for a start”.

The 2013 production of Peter Shaffer’s Equus was deemed “absolutely outstanding” and cited as “probably the best performance of any play by an amateur group that we have ever seen”. It went on to say: “The quality of acting by all the cast was exceptional and certainly every bit as good as one would expect from a professional company.”
The plaudits continued with the most recent offering Allo Allo earlier this year, when it was praised for being well-staged and described as “tres bien!”

For many members though it’s about more than just drama – the club has a lively social scene with many activities planned outside the rehearsal room which has included quiz nights, Aunt Sally and the now legendary Annual Thames Walk!

They are always looking for new members to join them.

Abingdon Drama Club

The next production is Peter Shaffer’s Amadeus on 25th to 28th September. The fictionalised version of the relationship between Salieri and Mozart pitches the established composer against the genius whom Salieri believes to be a vulgar, arrogant monster, but did Salieri murder Mozart?

Tickets £10, £8 concessions, from the website or The Bookstore in Bury Street. Find out more below or email [email protected]

A radical festival

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Despite severe weather warnings, early August saw 66,000 revellers descend upon the stunning South Downs National Park and throw themselves into the wild, magnificent and often ridiculous five-day adventure that is the mammoth Boomtown festival.

As predicted, on Friday gale force wind and heavy rainstorms threaten to dampen everyone’s spirits as tents are flattened across campsites and one of the main stages is shut down. However, the “show must go on!” Campers pull together to help their neighbours and the organisers reschedule all the acts from the closed stage.

One of the UK’s largest, independent music and theatrical festivals, Boomtown resembles something from the script of Michael Crichton’s Westworld (complete with its own Artificial Intelligence storyline). It is a theme park for adults that pulsates with stupendous sights and sounds blasting your senses all weekend. With so much on offer, here are just five reasons why Boomtown towers above the rest:

Green mission

Boomtown’s ongoing priority is to protect the environment from the impact of such a large event. One of the key messages is “Leave No Trace”. Green initiatives include no single-use plastic on sale; 100% compostable serveware; WaterAid refill stations and hundreds of recycling bins; reduced carbon emissions from travel and powering the festival; portable pouches for cigarette butts; an Eco Bond scheme to exchange bags of recycling for cash; and encouraging everyone to take everything home with them – 22,000 tents were left at Boomtown last year – a third of the festival’s capacity.

Boomtown storyline

Since the festival’s conception in 2009, the immersive element has always been entrenched in its ever-evolving storyline. The narrative this year, Chapter 11: A Radical City, has a firm focus on the environment, sustainability and activism. The story is 100% interactive and the public are invited to engage with it. There is an Immersive Maze for true gamers allowing players to go on a quest that unlocks secret areas and plot twists taking a journey deep down the rabbit hole. One person I chatted to even has business cards printed for his Boomtown persona, Xander Hawkmaul.

Theatrics and stage design

Boomtown’s fictitious city consists of 12 unique, themed districts that house thousands of actors in full costume who will engage with you and bring the city streets to life whether it’s an interrogation from the Boomtown Bobbies or a Wild West gunfight. In exchange for a toilet roll, we took a spin on the ‘Wheel of Misfortune’ and were drawn into ‘The Sweatbox’ which was the smallest rave I’ve ever experienced, contained in a vehicle that resembles a horse box.

There are 25 main stages and more than 80 street venues to explore at Boomtown. Immense structures dominate the skyline and act as creative showpieces that soar above the cavorting crowds below. Epic towers glow and shimmer with an abundance of multi-coloured lasers, gigantic screens projecting futuristic imagery and florescent acrobatic shows.

A raucous punk-inspired ex-military hanger promises shrieking guitars and trashing drums. Discarded cars piled high form a gritty, dystopian scrapyard. Flames erupt from front of stage almost as if a dragon was lashing out, spewing fire at the audience. An impressive, temple-like set has huge waterfalls flowing down each side – Mike Skinner couldn’t resist climbing up it and cooling off in the cascade mid-way through The Streets show.

Scattered throughout the woodland are forest parties adorned with a cornucopia of colourful, psychedelic decorations; multi-layered treetop walkways; hidey holes to crawl into and a beach-style retreat.

Plenty of smaller venues line the streets from pop-up nightclubs and discos to a plush ballroom, lavish hotel and casino, though to Mr Whomp’s ice cream van, the Inconvenience Store and the much-loved Office Christmas Party at the Job Centre. Sunday’s Carnival Parade is a must-see spectacle that is awash with dazzling costumes and fantastic props.

And, if all this stimulation gets too much, you can escape to the hills and relax at the spa or witness the sunset from the top of Whistlers Green looking down on all the action.

Music

Unlike other music festivals, Boomtown doesn’t rely on big name headliners to pull in the masses, however it can still compete with the “big boys” boasting household names such as Ms Lauryn Hill, The Streets, Groove Armada, Salt ‘N’ Pepa, UB40 and Chase & Status. With over 1,000 artists performing across 80 genres, the music range is diverse to say the least.

There is heavy bass booming out of every nook and cranny covering almost every electro genre imaginable, so for dance music enthusiasts it’s a dream. There are also many other musical delights waiting over every hill from punk rock and metal to reggae and ska, hip-hop and disco to folk and jazz. Boomtown champions underground subcultures so it’s easy to unearth something that you haven’t heard before.

Highlights for me come from raving in the Hidden Woods at the Calypso-inspired Soca vs Jungle Soundclash where DJs and MCs duel for audience votes; an outstanding set from techno heavyweight Carl Cox; and Beans On Toast whose folk song Magic about the birth of his daughter brings a tear to my eye – it’s Sunday by then and I must be tired and emotional.

A final push on Sunday night ends with Prophets of Rage who show they are seasoned pros by working the crowd with mosh-inducing hits from Rage Against the Machine and old school Cypress Hill and Public Enemy hip-hop tracks. Tom Morrello’s guitar skills, as always, blow me away!

The people

As you can imagine the mix of people who attend Boomtown is as diverse as the music on offer, but it works. From bucket-hat wearing Drum ‘n’ Bass kids, through cyber punks and metallers to hippies, geeks and old timers, everyone is there to have fun and party hard! You will see mad and marvellous costumes, sequins and glitter galore and the utterly bizarre.

There is a real sense of community and comradery that exudes from the festival and its inhabitants which makes it very easy to form new bonds (if only a friend for the night). Boomtown is certainly a place to leave your hang-ups at home and join in with the crazy. My only complaint is that my now 40-year-old body and mind take a whole lot longer to recover!

Read more about Boomtown

Milestone millions

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In May we told you about the Community Foundation for Surrey and the work they do to support causes through its family of donors, they are now delighted to have reached a magnificent milestone

Emerge Advocacy_WEB
Artventure Trust_WEB

The Community Foundation for Surrey has now awarded more than £10million in grants to support local charities and community groups.

The philanthropic organisation works with local donors wanting to give back to their community by connecting them with projects in Surrey working to improve health and wellbeing, the disadvantaged, the environment, education, sports and the arts.

In 2018 and 2019, more than £1.4million was awarded across 436 grants – the greatest amount in a single year since the charity began.

Among those to have benefitted are Emerge Advocacy and Artventure Trust.

Emerge Advocacy was launched to provide mental health support to young people admitted to A&E at Guildford’s Royal Surrey County Hospital in response to their needs and vulnerabilities. Supportive adults operate as mentors for patients during their time in A&E and after to reduce anxiety and help young people engage with services which may be able to help.
Founder of Emerge Advocacy, Joy Wright said: “There has been significant demand for Emerge projects across a number of Surrey hospitals. This grant from the CFS has made it possible for us to launch a further project at St Peter’s Hospital, Chertsey, that is now busy supporting young people with a variety of mental health issues.”

The Artventure Trust works with adults with learning difficulties enabling them to be creative, have fun and make new friends in a supportive environment. Sessions improve self-expression, develop skills and enhance self-esteem through the use of a variety of materials and techniques allowing clients to produce unusual and exciting art.

Trustee of Artventure Trust, Paul Charlesworth said: “At a time when local authorities are cutting back on funding for learning disabled adults, we have been very lucky to have secured financial support through the CFS. This has allowed us to carry on with our work in support of one of the most disadvantaged and vulnerable groups in our society – for which we are most grateful.”

Announcing the fantastic achievement of the £10million milestone, CFS Chief Executive Laura Thurlow thanked all those who have helped reach this. She said: “Our aim is to encourage and inspire more local people to join our growing family of donors. If you are wanting to support your local community, we would love to hear from you.”

The Foundation is due to launch a report next year highlighting the needs that still exist in Surrey.

• More than £25million has been generated to support Surrey communities since 2005

• Each year the foundation supports more than 200 voluntary groups across the county

• UK Community Foundations have collectively awarded over £1 billion in grants

Surrey Community Foundation

For more information, visit

Heritage Open Days

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Bombay Sapphire Distillery Self Discovery Experience-Glasshouses designed by Thomas Heatherwick (credit: Bombay Sapphire)

Discover history, architecture and culture at Heritage Open Days

Child and a National Trust Visitor Services Assistant in the museum at Avebury, Wiltshire.
Child and a National Trust Visitor Services Assistant in the museum at Avebury, Wiltshire.
Guildford Middleton Hall Staffordshire Rifleman
Guildford Middleton Hall Staffordshire Rifleman

History and heritage are all around, there may even be some hidden gems on your doorstep and there’s no better time to discover them than during this year’s Heritage Open Days.

It’s bigger and better than ever in 2019 with 10 consecutive days of events from 13th to 22nd September featuring 5,000 events and 40,000 volunteers.

This year marks the 25th anniversary of Heritage Open Days with the theme for the year being People Power in recognition of the 200th anniversary of the Peterloo Massacre marking the ways in which people have changed the world, from marches and sit-ins to peaceful protests and rebel songs.

There are hundreds of events and open days to choose from, there’s sure to be something to suit every taste, here are just a few to tempt you:

Ascot – presentation on the history of Ascot Priory and a guided tour, 19th

Newbury – talk on Shaw House with access to many areas not usually open to the public, 14th & 15th

Caversham – guided tour of the riverside Caversham Court Gardens and family architecture trail, 21st

Reading – Green Park Wind Turbine tour featuring facts, figures and experiments for the kids, 15th & 19th

Woodley – special opening of St John’s Church, former primary school and head teacher’s cottage, 21st

Thatcham – enjoy a three-stop walking tour of some of Thatcham’s most historically significant buildings, 15th

Wokingham – join a celebration of the 800th anniversary of having a Market Charter with activities and demonstrations inside the town hall and out

Oxford – find out how medical researchers use ‘big data’ to answer questions about human health around the world with artwork, virtual lab tours and science games at the Big Data Institute, 14th or how about The Kilns, the home and garden of CS Lewis, 14th. There are almost 100 to choose from in Oxford

Abingdon – a rare chance to see the Victorian cells of the former county police station, 21st

Burford – tour the Burford Quaker Meeting House and discover the history of the building which dates back to 1709, 14th

Cirencester – view an old hunting dog kennel currently housing a microbrewery in Cirencester Park, 13th & 14th

Alton – three museums focus on Gilbert White and the Oates Collections with the chance to view them all, 19th

Guildford – visit the central area and remains of Chilworth Gunpowder Mills, 15th; enjoy the unique garden and views from Jellicoe Roof Garden, 14th & 15th or explore the Medieval Undercroft in High Street, a Grade II* listed building dating from the 13th century, 14th & 15th

Woking – join the Basingstoke Canal Society for a trip from The Lightbox to the Muslim Burial Ground in Woking, 14th & 21st

People_Power - In the footsteps of the Suffragettes (credit: Dorking Museum)
People_Power - In the footsteps of the Suffragettes (credit: Dorking Museum)
Royal holloway foundersbuilding
Royal holloway foundersbuilding

Heritage Open Days

There are far too many to list but for a full guide to what’s around you and further afield, all for FREE…

Pruning v chopping!

Round & About

I thought I would take a light hearted look at the subject of pruning or as many people call it ‘chopping’ ‘hacking’ or ‘trimming’.

 

As a horticultural tutor and consultant the one thing I see in gardens that makes my heart sink is badly pruned trees and shrubs.

I feel it is my duty as a professional to teach people the correct way to prune in order to get the best from their garden. It takes years for a plant to grow and five minutes to destroy it……

Chopping/Hacking/Trimming

Anyone can do this, especially with a machine and at any time of year.

Fine for weeds, unwanted plants and dead ones.

You don’t need to be trained or qualified if you don’t want to be.

Can kill or seriously damage established plants, preventing growth, flowering and fruiting.

Looks horrible.

Pruning

The skill of pruning takes a lifetime of knowledge and practise. Plants need to be pruned correctly at the right time of year.

Every garden plant not only has a proper name but also a lifecycle and very specific pruning requirements.

You need a good level of training, qualifications and experience to undertake it successfully.

A good knowledge of pruning can ensure your plants thrive for a long time, flower, produce fruit and be beautiful sight. A well pruned Wisteria can look amazing in winter as well as in flower.

Want to learn?

Cathie’s Gardening School Services

A personalised and unique professional service tailored to your gardening requirements.

1. Horticultural consultancy teaching you in your own garden. This includes identifying your plants and how to prune them correctly at the right time of year to help you work out a maintenance programme.

2. Cathie’s Garden Army team of horticulturists can transform your garden, often in a day, following a consultancy. You may prefer us to do the hard work for you and pruning according to season.

3. Maintenance by team members once the garden is maintainable depending on our availability.

[email protected]

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